Month: March 2019

Vegan Breakfast Nachos

Vegan Breakfast Nachos

I am a sucker for chips and salsa. I’d rather eat chips and salsa over any gluten-free sweet treat. So you can see why I was so excited when it dawned on me that I could have them for breakfast. Insert my gluten-free free and 

How to Enjoy a Gluten-Free Life

How to Enjoy a Gluten-Free Life

I had a high school student email me this weekend asking me if I had any advice for people with Celiac Disease and similar conditions on how to enjoy the moment. Essentially, he was asking me my tips on how to enjoy a gluten-free life. 

Probiotic Pickled Red Onion Recipe

Probiotic Pickled Red Onion Recipe

Pickled Red Onion Recipe

Last week I posted my favorite Quick Pickled Cucumber recipe and now I’m posting my favorite Probiotic Pickled Red Onion recipe. Can you tell that I love pickled foods?

Not only is this Probiotic Pickled Red Onion recipe quick to make but it also requires almost no-hands on time. That’s right, keep your stove off, because this recipe just requires resting time. Oh, the power of osmosis…

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Why I love this Probiotic Pickled Red Onion Recipe

  1. This recipe is probiotic, and if you know me, I’m all about trying to source nutrients from food. So probiotic food instead of probiotic supplements? Yes, please! F.Y.I. Probiotics are amazing for gut health and tons of other things (learn more here).
  2. It’s quick to make. I know I said that already, but seriously do not doubt my need and dedication to quick & easy (yet delicious) food.
  3. It’s packed full of flavor. No joke, adding these probiotic pickled red onions to any savory dish will take it to a new level (not just taste-wise)! Think nachos, tacos, salads, soups, toast, and sandwiches. Can someone say yum?

Let’s Talk Probiotic Pickled Red Onion Ingredients:

Red Onion

The star of the show in this recipe, the red onion is used for flavor. It also offers prebiotic qualities which can help nourish your gut on top of the probiotics. Yay for gut healthy condiments!

Raw Garlic Cloves

Adds flavor and prebiotic properties to the probiotic pickled red onions. Trust me, you do not want to skip out on this. Also as tempting as it might be, do not sub garlic powder for raw garlic cloves. Trust me on this, the flavor won’t be the same.

Salt

Any good pickle is salty! It helps create a delicious brine and pickle flavor that you know and love.

Raw (Unpasteurized) Red Wine Vinegar

Now, this is the important part. If you want this probiotic pickled red onion recipe to be probiotic you have to use raw unpasteurized red wine vinegar. If it’s unfiltered that’s even better. This post isn’t sponsored but here is an Amazon affiliate link to my favorite raw unpasteurized and unfiltered red wine vinegar. It’s honestly so worth it and not too expensive! If you don’t have raw red wine vinegar you can use raw apple cider vinegar but it will change the flavor profile.

How to enjoy Pickled Red Onions

Enjoy these pickled red onion on top of hamburgers, hot dogs, Buddha bowls and more. My favorite way to eat these probiotic raw pickled onions is by blending them into a hummus. Talk about delicious dips…

Probiotic Pickled Red Onions

Prep Time7 mins
Passive time2 hrs
Course: Condiments, Ferment, probiotic, Salads
Cuisine: Dairy-Free, Gluten-Free, Paleo, Vegan / Plantbased
Keyword: probiotic pickled red onion
Servings: 16

Ingredients

  • 1 red onion (peeled)
  • 1 clove garlic (sliced thinly)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup raw red wine vinegar

Optional

  • 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro
  • 1 tbsp sugar

Instructions

  • Slice (or dice, whatever you want) the red onion
  • Stuff the red onion into a jar (I used multiple 8oz jars)
  • Add in salt and garlic (and optional ingredients if using)
  • Pour in raw red wine vinegar until jars are full (you might use a little more or less than a cup). If you want a less potent pickled onion, you may dilute with distilled water (it must be distilled water though to promote probiotic activity)
  • Let the mixture sit for AT LEAST 2 hours (even better if you can wait 24 hours) before enjoying!
  • Good in the fridge for AT LEAST a week but perhaps longer (use your best judgement).
The Divide in the Gluten-free Community

The Divide in the Gluten-free Community

As someone striving to be an advocate in the gluten-free community, it has become apparent to me that there is a huge issue. There is a divide in the gluten-free community and it’s making us weak. It’s making people confused when they try to serve 

Probiotic Quick Pickled Cucumber

Probiotic Quick Pickled Cucumber

Pickles and probiotics are my life and passion. I eat something pickled at least once a day. I love this Probiotic Quick Pickled Cucumber recipe because it’s fast and easy to make. Perfect for when I run out of pickles and need a quick fix. 

5 Common Gluten-Free Diet Nutrient Deficiencies

5 Common Gluten-Free Diet Nutrient Deficiencies

There are a lot of concerns surrounding a gluten-free lifestyle and nutrients. Because a gluten-free diet is so restrictive and far from the western norm, there are some concerns for potential common gluten-free diet nutrient deficiencies.

Not to mention, if your gut isn’t working right (which is often the case when recovering after a celiac diagnosis), then your nutrient absorption might not be up to par. In this post, I will discuss 5 common gluten-free diet nutrient deficiencies that should be on your radar if you’re living a gluten-free lifestyle.

I want to make it clear, when I say a gluten-free diet I mean a lifestyle that is necessary for those diagnosed with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Additionally, this post lists foods that are rich in the common gluten-free diet nutrients of concern. While I support and promote a food-first approach, sometimes food isn’t enough and supplementation should be considered. Click here for 10 Supplements for Celiac Disease.


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5 Common Gluten-Free Diet Nutrient Deficiencies


Iron

Our first nutrient deficiency up on the list is iron. Iron is one of the common gluten-free diet nutrient deficiencies for a few reasons.

1. If you have celiac disease and are recovering from damage in your small intestine, your iron absorption could be impaired.

2. Breakfast cereals and bread are often enriched with iron (and other nutrients) but their gluten-free alternates are often not.

These two reasons are why iron is a major gluten-free nutrient deficiency concern.


Magnesium

Magnesium is a common nutrient deficiency seen in people living gluten-free for similar reasons to Iron. (In fact, a lot of the reasons these nutrients are of concern are similar).

Wheat and other whole grains are rich in magnesium and are one of the main sources of magnesium in the diet. When you live gluten-free often, grains are restricted (and some like Wheat, are removed entirely). This means that your biggest contributing source of magnesium is removed on a gluten-free diet leaving you susceptible to magnesium deficiency.

Not to mention magnesium is absorbed in the small intestine and if you’re recovering from damage, well you might not be absorbing as much as you need.

Signs of Magnesium Deficiency:

True magnesium deficiency is rare however, people with celiac disease are at risk due to intestinal damage. Here are some symptoms:

Magnesium Rich Foods to Help with Deficiencies:

  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Sesame Seeds
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Black beans
  • Quinoa, buckwheat, & brown rice
  • Green leafy vegetables

Folic Acid / Folate

Just like the above mentioned nutrients, people on a gluten-free diet may also be prone to this nutrient deficiency. People with celiac disease are prone due to impaired absorption in the small intestine, but that’s not all.

Because fortified grains are removed from the gluten-free diet, even people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can be deficient in folate. This is because our grains are fortified with B-Vitamins (among other things).

Signs of Folate Deficiency

Folate deficiency can cause folic acid deficiency anemia, a condition you can read much more about here. People with celiac disease especially, are often diagnosed following persistent and unresolved anemia related to nutrient deficiencies. If you are deficient in folate you may experience anemia and anemia related symptoms.

Foods Rich in Folate to Fight Deficiency:

  • Citrus fruit
  • Leafy Greens (spinach, romaine lettuce, turnip greens)
  • Asparagus
  • Lentils (and other legumes)
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Avocado
  • Eggs

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Calcium + Vitamin D
(The Dairy Double Whammy)

When you have celiac disease the damage to your small intestine can impair your ability to absorb nutrients (as discussed previously). Two of these nutrients are crucial to bone health and those nutrients are Calcium and Vitamin D. If you gut is still under recovery after a celiac diagnosis you might be at risk for a deficiency.

This is also one of the common gluten-free diet nutrient deficiencies because of a related issue. Often when people are diagnosed with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten-sensitivity, they also are intolerant to dairy. This means often people living gluten-free (including myself) restrict calcium-rich and vitamin D fortified dairy products. Thus, people following a gluten-free lifestyle are at risk deficiency in both nutrients.

The risk of deficiency of both nutrients also leaves people with celiac disease at high risk for development of osteoporosis. This is why it’s extremely important to find a health professional who is well versed in the implications of celiac disease to make sure they are monitoring your health appropriately (I.E. bone density scans!).

Calcium Rich Food Sources to Fight Deficiency:

  • Milk (if you aren’t sensitive to it)
  • Chia Seeds
  • Poppy Seeds
  • Sesame Seeds
  • Figs
  • Sardines & Canned Salmon (bonus points if it’s with bones)
  • Beans and Lentils
  • Almonds
  • Dark Leafy Greens
  • Fortified foods (like orange juice, dairy alternatives)

Vitamin D Rich Food Sources to Fight Deficiency:

  • Fatty fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, etc.)
  • Fortified foods (orange juice, soy milk, milk, etc.)
  • Beef liver
  • Cheese
  • Egg yolks
  • While not a food source, the sun is a great source too. Make sure you’re soaking up enough rays!

While not an all-inclusive list, this is a great starting point on knowing what nutrient deficiencies to keep on eye on if you living gluten-free. As always, consult your medical health professionals if you have any concerns about nutrient deficiencies. This post is not to take the place of individualized medical care provided by your health-care team/provider[s].

Food Sensitivities and Celiac Disease

Food Sensitivities and Celiac Disease

Food Sensitivities and Celiac Disease If you have celiac disease and you are struggling to find relief, it might be because you have unaddressed food sensitivities or intolerances (learn why following a gluten-free diet isn’t enough to support someone with celiac disease here). So if 

Vegan Caramel Chia Pod

Vegan Caramel Chia Pod

I should disclose that I am not vegan but I do appreciate a plant-based diet. Thus, I appreciate plant-based alternatives, like the vegan caramel topping in this Vegan Caramel Chia Pod recipe. This post was paid for by Drizzilicious but all thoughts and reviews on